NEW KITTEN CARE

Congratulations on the addition of a new kitten to your family!

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Here are a few important points on caring for kittens.

VACCINATIONS:

We routinely immunise against Cat Flu and Feline Enteritis.

These diseases are sadly still common among the unvaccinated cat population, and very contagious through casual contact with other cats.

FOR KITTENS:

At 8 weeks old.............FLU/ENTERITIS/CHLAMYDIA VACCINE

At 12 weeks old...........FLU/ENTERITIS/CHLAMYDIA VACCINE

At 16 weeks old...........FLU/ENTERITIS/CHLAMYDIA VACCINE

Kittens older than 12 weeks still require 2 initial vaccines for protection.

For Adults: Annual FLU/ENTERITIS/CHLAMYDIA BOOSTER

Remember Boarding Catteries require vaccinations to be current.

There are also vaccines available against Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (Cat AIDS) and Feline Leukaemia (FeLV). Cat AIDS is especially a problem with any cat that goes outside. These vaccines can be incorporated into the routine vaccine programme. (More information on Vaccinations)

INTESTINAL WORMS:

We recommend worming cats for roundworm, hookworm and tapeworm:

Between 3 to 8 weeks old...…..WEEKLY

Between 8 to 12 weeks old.…...EVERY 2 WEEKS

Between 3 to 6 months old........MONTHLY

THEN......…….. 3 MONTHLY FOR LIFE

(N.B.) If worms are seen, worm them anyway.

A GOOD BROAD SPECTRUM WORMER (eg. Milbemax) IS THE BEST WAY TO WORM YOUR PET.

MANY TABLETS AND LIQUIDS SOLD IN PET SHOPS AND SUPERMARKETS DO NOT KILL ALL WORMS.

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HEARTWORM:

Every cat exposed to mosquitoes may be at risk. There is no treatment, only prevention, which can be a once a month tablet (MILBEMAX) or a monthly spotton application (REVOLUTION).

(More information on Heartworm)

DESEXING:

Desexing helps prevent roaming and fighting habits developing, especially in Tom Cats. There is no advantage in Queens having a litter. Queens can come into season as early as 6 months (sometimes earlier).

We recommend desexing both male and female cats at 5-6 months of age. (For more information, see our page on Desexing)

MICROCHIPPING:

Can be done at the same time as desexing, or vaccination. (See Microchipping)

GOOD NUTRITION:

Rules:

  1. Kittens cannot survive on raw meat only.
  2. A good variety of food between 6 and 12 weeks of age means a less fussy adult cat.
  3. Always introduce a new food a little at a time to start, otherwise upset tummies may follow.
  4. We recommend a well-balanced PREMIUM DRY FOOD 

How Often to Feed:

  • 4 times daily to 8 weeks old
  • 3 times daily 8 to 12 weeks old
  • Then twice daily (maybe once daily after 6 months).
  • Do not feed purely dry food to a male cat.
  • Always have fresh water available.

FLEAS:

There are many products on the market; we recommend the topical spot on formulations (REVOLUTION).

But remember you must do two things for total flea control:

  1. Attack fleas environment where they breed i.e. anywhere the pets spend time (carpet, bedding)
  2. Treat ALL pets in the household.  

Always check labels of chemicals before use. Some chemicals cannot be used with others and cannot be used on cats.

Never use permethrin products such as Advantix or Permoxin on cats.    

POISONS:

Cats are very susceptible to many products including some that are safe in dogs. eg DETTOL, ASPIRIN, PARACETAMOL.

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GROOMING and TRAINING:

Regular grooming is essential, particularly for long-haired cats. Start grooming your kitten early on so that it becomes an enjoyable bonding activity and part of routine care.  Grooming removes dust, dead skin, grass seeds and reduces the amount of fur shed during the moulting season in autumn and spring.

Kittens are very playful and curious and love to develop their instinctive hunting behaviour by chasing toys.  Play time is a good opportunity for you to teach your kitten good manners.  Occasionally hunting games turn into play aggression – make sure that the fun ends if their claws come out.  If they do something naughty, such as sharpening their claws on the furniture, give them a gentle spray with a water pistol.  It is important that your kitten doesn’t turn their hunting skills on the local wildlife.  Place bells on your cat’s collar and keep them in at night to make sure that the native animals are safe.

For more information, please call us on 3284 5133.

 

 

Tags

kitten, vaccination, desexing, worming